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that everything must be on the table including defense which accounts for 20% that you probably know of the budget that the defense doesn't seem to be on the table in terms of lightly discussed solutions or strategies. instead we confront the sequestration, a thoroughly bad idea for getting the defense budget or any other budget unless we take action we could take a fiscal or economic crisis that forces the cuts to the military priorities, steep and arbitrary cuts that are more coherent or prioritized. the question is can we and how do we achieve savings that can improve our fiscal outlook while meeting our national security needs. to quote at arnall mullen again, he said the pentagon budget was basically doubled in the last decade and in doubling the ability to prioritize to make the decisions to deutsch analyses to make trades. we also need a review of the defense strategy that makes sure that we are preparing for the threats and risks of the 21st century, not those of the past. the efforts on the longest lines to help advance the best ideas for improving our defense strategy. earlier this year,
nuclear program. part of an event recently hosted by the foundation for defense of democracy here in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel. i spent the entire night last night time to think of a way to do this and entertaining and humorous way. there is no such a way. this is about weapons of mass destruction in the middle east. it is a serious topic, and we have very serious experts. people who are the leading rights in non-proliferation. joe had the privilege of spending a year working with in a project on the lease nonproliferation, and we're going to have a very detailed report that we will be issuing in january. well over 100 pages already. very specific recommendations on how to deal with this grave threat. we have talked about the iranian nucle
going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they do so in a way that avoids conflict, that avoids miscalculation, that uses the vehicles available today through diplomacy and through those legal forums that allow them to get to reasonable solutions on these w
] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn hostile in the united states and its allies. new developments, he has led the way on many issues of great concern to ftd. he is founder and co-chair of the bipartisan senate caucus on weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, in that capacity worked across the partisan divide to highlight serious threats of -- weapons of mass deliberation. he has done as much to run our greatest threat in the middle east and often lead the way on pressure advancing nuclear activities and efforts to destabilize the middle east. in
for defense of democracy. they are hosting a forum called "dictators and dissidents." we'll take you live to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution
by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some sophisticated weapons. can we afford to wait a year for the regional solution. >> i think one of the things as we
where it should be and and the bloated defense budget. unnecessary social programs. me? i think we aren't where we need to be yet when the it comes to abandoning all the hope. i think the postfiscal cliff world has -- not to matter. those people are polyannas. i think we go into a recession with lots of layoffs and the fiscal cliff was designed to compromise. the cliff was designed to scare legislators into rising above politics and compromise. everyone knew about the growth. just like in europe. means it could be, in fact, reduced dramatically. fewer jobs, larger deficit. not smaller. and the federal reserve that's throwing up its hands, can't do anything. as i said last night, it doesn't matter. we can pick our stocks and buy them down. like the fabulous names, amazon, ulta salons. buy them down in scales like i outline in the book "real money." now suggesting other groups giving you a bang for the buck. new groups betting that the hope will be squeezed out and the bottom gets put in before a deal is made -- or not. why not? we know the auto market is for 11 years now and we have been
defense, our pasture there, and that of our allies and partners. >> well, yes, i have nothing further to add they are can wanted to discuss that with our allies to determine the times and location so i have nothing more than that. when it comes to missile ballistic defense, there's a problem that affects our partners, allies in the region, as well as the homeland in that we'll continue to wait for opportunity to be able to strengthen our partnerships and our capabilities with our allies to be able to deal with the threats as they e emerge. we're going that today. >> intercepters, anything else? >> at this point in time, i'm not prepared to talk about any of the details of that. i would just say that we continue to look for opportunities to improve our capabilities as the threat set changes and grows. >> [inaudible] india, first trip, give us a sense of what kind relations nay have with india and who will be your proprieties, and basically, u.s. was included as a partner with -- [inaudible] how help you in your activities? >> stating with the last question first. as far as the indian o
that we double defense, created a whole new category of spending called homeland security, went to war twice totally on a credit card, created a brand new entitlement medicare part d, and we have the aging of a population that means the entitlement programs that have been wonderfully successful, those of us were willing to say we need to entitlement reform, not because medicare and social security have not been successful, they have been, and consequently, all we are living a lot longer, which is good, but it does mean the math -- when i was a kid, 16 people were working paying for everyone retiree, now is 3 to 1, and in a decade will be 2 to 1, means we have to make adjustments. the math deniers around that i have a hard time grappling with. the simpson-bowles gang had $2.40 trillion in revenue. if we think we need to go bigger, which i do believe -- $1.6 trillion is still only 1/3 of what we had in the revenue line in the 90's. in my memory, the american economy did pretty darn well. i do think there are ways to get there. on entitlements, i find we have to challenges around health c
to consider overturning both the federal defense of marriage act and state bans on gay marriage next year. nine states and the district of columbia have already legalized same sex marriage, most recently maryland, maine and washington. a recent gallup poll shows a majority of americans for the first time support gay marriage. back in 1996, just a quarter of the country did. today, 53% as you see support it. 46% are opposed. let me bring in executive director of log cabin republicans, r. clark cooper, and democratic strategist and former dnc advisor to the obama '08 campaign, jamal simmons. gentlemen, good morning. >> good morning. >> opposition to gay marriage has obviously softened, even among conservatives. here's what george will had to say about the issue. >> this decision by the supreme court came 31 days after an election day in which three states for the first time endorsed same sex marriage. they could see it's now safe to look at this because there is something like an emerging consensus. quite riliterally, the oppositi to gay marriage is dying. >> here's what he's talking about.
minutes, reaction to the decision to hear two cases regarding gay marriage. one with the defense of marriage act and the other looking at proposition 8. the first 45 minutes, if you want to weigh in on the decision of the supreme court, here is how you can do so. the numbers -- if you want to send us a tweet -- here is the front page of "the oakland tribune." that is the setting for one of the cases the justices will hear. it gives a little bit of the text put into place when it was signed into law. this is part of section 7. and determining the ruling regulation of the bureau and agencies of the united states, the word marriage means only a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife, and the words bouse refers only to a person of the opposite sex who is a husband or wife. one of looking at a state militia and the other looking at a federal issue, two cases, and a decision expected by june. if you want to wait and, the numbers are on your screen. -- if you want to weigh in, the numbers are on your screen. tweets.also send us tweak this is from "the washington p
gets one of his two sacks. the defense did not allow a touchdown until the 4th quarter. the 49ers got a big break early in the 3rd. the muffed punt recovered by stillman. frank gore burrows into the end zone. the 49ers went on an 83-yard, 7:30 drive. anthony dixon punched it in from there to make it 20-6. the dolphins weren't finished. anthony fasano in the back of the end zone. a super effort to make a one handed catch, and get his knee down in bounds. the dolphins within a touchdown at 20-13. but after a 49ers stop on defense, they put it away here. kaepernick on the option keeps it. he gets an escort from walker on the 50-yard run. the 49ers improve to 9-3-1 which keeps them in the number 2 playoff spot in the nfc. 27-13 the final. it's onto new england next sunday for the niners. another workman like effort for gore. >> i got this before the season. i knew we had the dolphins 0 on the schedule. i said we've got to flip them upside down when we play them. >> do the thousand yards mean something more at this stage in your career? >> it's a blessing. you see everybody say when you tu
that we double defense, a tree today whole new category of spending called homeland security, went to war twice totally on a credit card, created a brand new entitlement medicare part d, and we have the aging of a population that means the entitlement programs that have been wonderfully successful, those of us were willing to say we need to entitlement reform, not because medicare and social security have not been successful, they have been, and consequently, all we are living a lot longer, which is good, but it does mean the math -- when i was a kid, 16 people were working paying for everyone retiree, now is 3 to 1, and in a decade will be 2 to 1, means we have to make adjustments. the math deniers around that i have a hard time grappling with. >the sense in-bowles -- simpson- bowles gang had $2.40 -- $ 2. tralee4 in in revenue. if we think we need to go bigger, which i do believe -- $1.6 trillion is still only 1/3 of what we had in the revenue line in the 90's. in my memory, the american economy did pretty darn well. i do think there are ways to get there. on entitlements, i find we hav
to talk about energy when it was a forbidden topic inhe defense department. this was through 2004. i got funding from the department of defense and it created the energy conversation. i want to get to a point tha was brought up inumb of times, having the american public understand this unbelievably complex story. i remmend you all watch alan alda's vido, "the flame." he asked what it was money was small and could not get an answer. he went up was don every university andy put on a worldwide contest to explain what a flame is to 11 ar-old. they h 600 submissns and 6011 year old evaluated this. keep in mind how complex that is. i bought a book two weeks ago called "black gold" r my granddaughter by albert marin. i recommend ofhe academics in this room or anywher not many people are going to read or understand your report. a lot of what needs doing telling this story as that it has to be visual because it is so unbelievably complicated, interdependence, integrated, and for most of us, ijust looks like chaos. i'm going to sgest that you do things like kids were stying english working with th
. you know what? one of the main things that the trading community has been looking at is a defense contractor. these guys are ground zero for any fiscal cliff stress. yesterday when the president got on and the future started selling off, we were watching the defense contractors. they weren't sliding whatsoever. so we were telling our clients, this is a near term blip in the market. unfortunately we are surrounding by headline trading. but a lot of the underlying current right now seem to be saying that the deal is saturdaying to come together. and i think becky hit it right on the head in the prior segment saying we're not seeing these guys in front of the cameras. they're in the rooms talking, which is important. so we keep telling clients, watch these defense contractors. it has utx, it has boeing, it has lockheed martin. these guys will be the most impacted by sequestration if this hits. so we always watch this for stress if the market is selling off for cliff reasons or if it's just a near term emotional blip. kelly, the other thing we're paying a lot of attention to is the go
down the federal law, the defense of marriage act, which says for federal purposes, 1,000 laws, tax benefits, access to people in hospitals, marriage is only between a man and a woman. they could just strike down that one and leave the rest up to the states. >> there's a whole range of things they could do. are the justices in any way influenced by the changing public opinion on this issue? we've seen a really dramatic shift in favor of gay marriage. >> that's the most interesting question in this case, dan. ten years ago, the supreme court would have decided this one way, probably unanimously or close to that. ten years from now, it will go the other direction. we're right at the hinge of history on this issue. does the supreme court crystallize what seems to be this emerging consensus, as you point out? or is it as william s. buckley say conservatives should do, standing on history and yelling stop. the court has this really interesting moment in which to decide one of the most controversial issues we are discussing. >> at the hinge of history. a lovely phrase. terry moran, anchor
? what would you allow others to do it? >> defense cuts cost jobs that the government cannot create jobs. >> i worked on a plane for four years. this is the biggest scam in the world. not the soldiers health care. host: why you say that? caller: is a huge amount of money. i was spent millions fixing a plane every day. it is more money than you can imagine. guest: the government looks at every job and activity. it is really hard to make the case that they overcharge. it is much more expensive because the way the government does it. there is performance of based logistics. you can save billions. it is the way avis would do it for cars. even save huge amounts of money. that means getting the back office out of the way. it means fewer back office jobs. they do not want to give up the power. host: the contacting system is really complicated. some of that is what the caller is saying. we have a lot of money through a system, a fair amount can disappear in ways we do not count. a history of 60 or 70 years of litigation against contractors to overcharge, contractors do overcharge. is not to say
defense university and a former member of the syrian national council, the last major syrian political opposition group. and fred hof, who served as secretary of state clinton's special adviser for the syrian transition until last september. he is now a senior fellow at the atlantic council. ambassador hof, i want to start with you. how significant is what the president said yesterday about this recognition? >> gwen, first of all, i'm delighted to be here. i think what the president had to say was extraordinarily significant. we're coming to the point now where we may be at or very close to a tipping point in syria. where the assad regime may be in serious jeopardy of going down. nevertheless, there are still millions, literally millions, of syrians on the fence. they have no illusions about the corruption, the incompetence, the brutality of this regime. but they do wonder what's next. recognizing this organization, making it clear that there is international support for it gives these syrians an opportunity to see what's next. >> ifill: murhaf jouejati, do you think it's significant?
. the defense did not allow a touchdown until the 4th quarter. the 49ers got a big break early in the 3rd. the muffed punt recovered by stillman. frank gore burrows into the end zone. the 49ers went on an y dixon pu from there to make it 20-6. the dolphins weren't finished. anthony fasano in the back of the end zone. a super effort ak
. president obama and defense secretary leon panetta responded to the news that a u.s. service member was killed during the rescue. quote: >> reporter: megyn? megyn: absolutely. jennifer, thank you. >>> well, new complaints today after union members picket a fundraiser for prostate cancer research. the union workers were complaining about the cable company executives who attended the fundraiser, but was this really the right place to do that? >>> and growing controversy after president obama shakes hands with the south korean singer whose music video just became the most watched in the world. but before this guy was a global sensation, it turns out -- and it surfaced last week -- that he made news with very angry, very anti-american rants about, quote, killing the yankees in response to the war in iraq and another issue. we will debate whether the president might want to take back that handshake and whether the singer's apology makes up for what he said in the past. ♪ twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligatio. i need to rethink the core of
of defense. and i've been somebody, i've supported every penny. i didn't vote for going to war in iraq, thought that was a huge mistake, but i've supported every dollar of spending for our troops in the field. and i can tell you, as a budget committee chairman, we can save more money in defense. and there are lots of republicans who know we can do it, too. mr. president, other mandatory, that's another category the republicans said save $300 billion there. i think they're $100 billion too high because we've already saved over $100 billion out of other mandatory spending in the budget deal we did last year. so let's save $200 billion. that would represent, again, 4% of what we are projected to spend over the next ten years in other mandatory spending. $5.1 trillion is what we're programmed to spend. $200 billion of savings there would represent 4%. again, i've had colleagues tell me, well, we can't possibly save $200 billion. i've had some staff people tell me we can't save $200 billion. so i say, okay, how much are we going to spend? how much are we going to spend? that $200 billion re
to the defense of her alleged assail i can't and says in the trial at arthur never lifted the ax she never believed he intended to hurt her she felt safe in his presence. he was just -- and she wanted the it to go away. and he did this and this and managed to get ore people to override the testimony. so arthur is convicted. there's only one punishment for that which is the death penalty. and so arthur bowen goes on to death row, and? january of 1836, is sentenced to death. and with the clock ticking, mrs. thorton does something even more -- it was amazing snuff enough she had testified on arthur's behalf on criminal trial. she starts out recruiting her friends in high society and she was very prominent woman. many prominent friend, easy access to the leadership of the country. she weptd to the vice president van buren and said use your good officings with the president jackson, tell him he should pardon arthur, you know. his mother is very good and, you know, she
of defense and his comments. i had the army chief of staff in my office a week or so ago telling me that they're looking at cutting 80,000 people out of the active duty army beginning now and that's before the massive cuts come through, i think the president's had this plan to cut our military, to dismantle it. i think what we're going to see is harmful effects on the american people when we try to defend this country in the next decade. >> in in a word do we avert the train wreck or get a front row seat and watch it happen? >> well, governor, one. things we hear from our constituents, they say wii want you to get an agreement and work this out, but always give this caveat. we don't want you to throw our principles the under the train and that's what i think you'll see the republicans do. we've passed proposal that will stop the huge tax cuts and tax rates from going up. we' we've passed something and i think they will hlet it go over the cliff. we're not going to throw the fundamentals that made this country great out the window. >> i certainly hope so, congressman, always a pleasure to chat
that a photo id will solve all problems. i have to play zone defense on all of this, on every different aspect. we have to stay vigilant with what ever bought a set -- foes system we are using. >> what do you think of that? >> i did not add to your question before and i still will not answer your question. you are asking the right question - [laughter] >> you, professor. >> that is from a big picture perspective. it has been an on/off switch. are we going to have it or not to? maybe the conversational mode the next few years to a best practices -- what are the best idea practices? and the amex folks come back within 10 days to show -- indiana makes folks come back with intended to show photo id but florida is a signature matched with their poll workers. what is the best way of achieving the best results? i hope maybe the conversation will move in that direction over the next few years rather than toward this yes/no attention we have. >> not all fogle id laws are created equal. there are some that restrict photo id loss and some better called photo id + but you don't really need a photo id lot
. obviously, trying to appeal to a younger demographic with this message. >> i was talking to a defense analyst the other day. he said the problem with all of this is the fact i'm worried about my 9-year-old. i'm worried about my 15-year-old. they're going to be paying unbelievable tax rates because we are dumping all of this on them. so on the one hand, yes, it looks like -- he looks a little crazy in this. a little goofy. at the same time, he's appealing to kids because, guess what? it's on you, kids. >> and you know what? i'm thinking that generation is not listening right now. they're not paying attention. >> when they pay the tax rates at 90% or 75% like france is doing, they'll listen. thanks, alan simpson. >> we applaud your efforts there, senator. good job. all right. we'll come back with the closing countdown. market still losing altitude. up just 94 points. >> after the bell, he said there will be no fiscal cliff deal without higher tax rates. find out if treasury secretary tim geithner thinks going over the deal is a better option than compromising on revenue. he joins us at
it does. awareness will failed to tackle the issue if it does not supplemented by an analysis defense efforts to trace what is going on from a supply chain to a beat. each sector, all of you belong to a sector of the party interested and center slavery, i will take the liberty of telling you what the efforts should be. i think we have to leave the field with policy recommendations related to issues like supply chance. guidance from scholars and find a way to comply globally and effectively. i cannot stress this enough. if we are doing a poor job of understanding and tackling slavery, we are doing a prophetic of a free empowering exportation everywhere at the to the world. similar efforts, and the organization. a everett is the distance of tournaments and to social movements the uplight movements on and they will when they beat so does fired a as untainted. we have to continue providing resource fort forces between government citizens and academia. a final word, echoes of past and said the food well go into the future were the sum, all, or none of these can be called slavery, it is an
to the "politico playbook." defense cuts have been a bit of a sticking point. we don't talk about them much. it's been all about taxes. you say some republicans now open to looking at trimming the defense budget. >> well, they are. and this is another part of this republican reboot we're seeing just in the last week. three big issues where the republican party is changing before our eyes. immigration, they want to talk about president obama about it, work with him on it, gay marriage. the house leaders who asked for one of the supreme court cases, silent since the court took it. now defense cuts. more and more republicans are saying that they're willing to talk about it. >> good. >> saying it junt cuts their credibility on other spending issues. >> good. >> it's the pentagon. >> there is so much waste in the pentagon. it's one of the few bureaucracies you can't audit. it is impossible. whether you're talking to peter peterson, dave walker, they tell you, you can't audit the pentagon. it is impossible. >> and yet there are some republicans you say who are willing to go out on a ledge and say it'
cliff. you'll raise some taxes, yes, that's true, you'll cut defense and some human services. this is the only way we'll have a significant bite out of this deficit. i think the market is going to like this. they say no right now, but when they see that this government is taking on the deficit in a serious way i think they will like it >> you don't think going over the cliff is armageddon? >> this is just nonsense, absolutely not. this is a bipartisan deal that was made. now both parties are trying to welch on their commitments. i think that's a mistake. >> steve, ben bernanke said today if we do go over the fiscal cliff, even if it's for a short period of time, it's going to be very costly and they do not have the tools to basically dig us out of it. do you believe if we go over the fiscal cliff it won't be as easy as the governor is suggesting? >> we're in trouble anyway this quarter and the next quarter and putting on taxes of any kind would be the wrong thing to do. sometimes the governor is a former physician, current physician, and you learn first go don't harm the pati
named silicon valley, but you had the defense industry; you had hewlett-packard, but you also had the counter-culture of the bay area. that entire brew came together in steve jobs. he was sort of a hippie-ish rebel kid, loved listening to dylan music, dropped acid, but also he loved electronics. >> jobs would eventually cross paths with a computer wizard at berkeley five years his senior named steve wozniak. they became fast friends, sharing a love of high-tech pranks and a disdain for authority. one of the things they did was to copy and improve an illicit device called a blue box, which reproduced the tones that the phone company used and allowed users to make free long-distance phone calls. >> wozniak loves the blue box. he's doing it as a prank. steve says, "we can sell them. we can market them." and they sold about 100 of 'em. and jobs said to me, "that's the beginning of apple. when we started doing that blue box, i knew that with wozniak's brilliant designs and my marketing skills, we could sell anything." >> that was still a few years off. jobs enrolled at reed college in
to go down, a million layoffs in the defense industry. no one seems to care right now. it's bad. >> you know what we have going for us? the grid, december 17 announced -- on a seasonal basis, they have reiterated once again that it doesn't have the demand to be sold year round, but starting a week from monday. >> i don't buy that. i think they do it because whenever they have mcrib, they're just fighting traffic for mcrib. there are places in the world where the mcrib is on the menu all the time. in case you're there on your vacation. >> i'm learning here all the time. i'm always learning. >> switch from the bacon cheese-inator. [ bell rings ] . >> celebrating the ground breaking of hotels in new york. we'll be speaking to the ceo in this hour. >> whitehorse is an interesting story. >> white house, delayed over at the nasdaq, the new york stock exchange puts out a release reiterating 16 companies have announced or moved to the big board so for this year. you're starting to wonder who would go public on the nasdaq. >> still waiting for the night capital resolution, knight had taken a rea
soaring into space. the north american air defense space said it put an object into orbit. north korea says it's a scientific satellite, but the u.s. believes the launch is a cover for testing ballistic missile technology. a senior administration official says the u.s. will wush for a u.n. security council resolution condemning the loss as well as possible sanctions. members began meeting behind closed doors about an hour ago. joining us is former new mexico governor bill richardson. gooz to see you. you're a former u.n. ambassador to the. does it concern you? >> it does concern me. my hope was that the new leader in north korea, kim jong-un, would pick a different path than his father, that he would be more moderate. i think still there's possibilities of dialogue. i'm not sure when. i think he did this for domestic reasons. the last missile launch failed. he only has one year in leadership. he wants to show his people that despite their economic problems, they have military and missile technolo technology, that they're a major power in space, militarilmilita buttress themselves with
wealth of 2009, we actually grew 2% and gained market share. there is a defensiveness. that is also created by the fact that we operate in a little less than is 00 countries. you know, locally with local teams so that gives us a natural hedge. and the other natural hedge that we have is that we sell fragrances and flavors to wide variety of brands. you know, local, regional or multi national clients which gives us a natural hedge from that standpoint. >> but then as you expand in the gd markets, i assume that you're confronted with a huge challenge. you're standing here in switzerland, you're thousands of miles away from where the end consumer is. how do you actually know what consumers let's say in south america, africa actually like in terms of fragrances? >> it's imminently linked to the culture of a local country. especially on the state side, especially on the flavor side. so we don't create fragrances and flavors for the indians and the chinese. we have 9,000 people around the world. half of them create the next fragrances and flavors. and out of those 4,500 people, you have r
to the munitions. a senior u.s. official and top diplomat tell cnn, the u.s. and its allies are using defense contractors to train syrian rebels on how to secure chemical weapons stockpiles. our sources say the training is taking place in jordan and it,ky. they tell us the syrian rebels are being trained on how to monitor and secure stockpiles but also on handling the weapons sites and weapons materials. >> how dicy is it to train syrian rebels on actually handling the materials? >> on the one hand, these may be individuals who are going to be the first ones into some of these sites. they have to know what safety precautions to take, otherwise they're not going to want to go in and they have to know what to look for. >> reporter: leonard specter is a chemical weapons expert. he says they are confident the syrians have cerron and mustard gas, a blistering agent. they may also have cyanide and vx. if these materials are mishandled -- >> probably what would happen is that individuals nearby would be terribly affected. perhaps killed or certainly injured in some serious fashion. but there might n
't, but what a great defense to be able to say, well, don't be angry with us, we've been saying to tax wealthy people. it's like-- >> deflecting anger at them. >> what a royal position to be in. it's an incredibly narcissistic and unasailable throne to which to ascend. i have mine, fellow like you, you have six kids. stuart: i do. >> earned your money, hopes to send, you know, your kids and grandkids to great schools. they're not your friends. they think you're taking advantage of other people or is it, as i would contend, that they're strategicically setting themselves so far apart that they're saying, everybody else fight with yourselves. we're going to stay over here in our very special club and claim that we care about the poor. stuart: well, i've got to say that i personally, my anger has not been deflected by what they're saying. in fact, my anger has been stoked. >> should be. stuart: i made every penny that i've got and as you say i've got six children, seven grandchildren. what is it with the guys who want to put their hand in-- the government's hand into my estate and deny my childre
, a defense official says no u.s. navy drone is missing. >>> we're about to take you live to cairo. that is where riot police are bracing now for another night of violent street fighting, tear gas all over the city today. this week crowds of egyptians have now stormed the presidential palace, breaking through fences, fighting with security forces, trying to keep them back. now, the protesters, they are furious about several things. first of all, all concerning president mohammed morsi and this growing perception that he is making himself too powerful. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. >> opposition factions back protesting against mohammed morrissey for nearly two weeks. most of the protests have been limited to tahrir square, but they're now going to the source of their anger, president morrissey, and his presidential palace. >> why come here? >> because it's -- we got fed up. >> he doesn't respect us. he don't want to listen to our demands. >> reporter: what's your message to him by coming out here? >> that what he is doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's co
on military and national defense, 53%. reducing spending on programs that benefit the poor, 51%. reducing spending on programs that benefit the elderly, 34%. compromise is an interesting issue, but as you tackle it, it becomes complicated. that is a quick snapshot of this survey. we have some vignettes that will follow. some of the respondents, we got on video. ron has done that also in print. thank you very much. >> more now from "national journal." congressman allyson schwartz sat down with "national journal" ron brownstein to talk about the fiscal cliff, job creation, and deficit reduction. >> let me introduce the moderator, ron brownstein. he is the editorial director of "national journal" and the "atlantic." he oversees political coverage coming out of our company. he writes a weekly column for "national journal" and is regularly on major cable networks and the real networks. dare i say, he is the most astute political analyst in washington. we have had changes. gene sperling at the last minute could not make it. there is a meeting going on right now, which may be productive -- maybe
from what is happening in the way the defense department is mulling the development of new technologies from basic sciences. >> i have been working for google for the last eight years. larry and sergei were brought together to create google. private industry. google is the epitome of the with the forces come together to create what i think is an innovation now. one thing you have to learn is he wants you to have a healthy disregard for the impossible. that is something that took me quite a while to shift my brain to work that way. i want to bring back to what president faust was talking about. what concerns me greatly because of the house the disregard for the impossible and working with educational institutions, i have great concerns for where we're going as a country and i will give two statistics. some of the numbers i have learned -- the united states is ranked 52nd in terms of the quality of the math and science education. that's something i think we need to focus in on. we are still number-one in innovation. i do not know we can say we need to focus only on stem, though clearly we
, and the defense budget is going to see the brunt of these spending reductions. most everything is 2% across the board. spending, additional cuts, $55 billion per year that is going to give them a total of $492 billion in cuts and this is going to leave our military with the smallest ground force since 1940, the smallest naval fleet since 1915, and the smallest task ta call fighting force in -- tactical fighting force in the history of the air force. medicare could see $16.4 billion in annual cuts leading to the elimination of 496,000 jobs in 2013. 62,000 physicians are going to be adversely impacted. and we know the sequester cuts are not -- are not fair to everybody. . we've talked about getting the fiscal house in order and cutting spending and fighting the growth in the debt. we've also passed some bills this year and i would like to remind the members of the body, mr. speaker, of these pieces of legislation that this house of representatives has already passed. and they're sitting on the desk over in the senate. now, we have on august 2 of this year, by a vote of 232-189, we passed the
defense, 53%. reducing spending on programs that benefit the poor, 51%. reducing spending on programs that benefit the elderly, 34%. compromise is an interesting issue, but as you tackle it, it becomes complicated. that is a quick snapshot of this survey. we have some vignettes that will follow. some of the respondents, we got on video. ron has done that also in print. thank you very much. >> allyson schwartz of pennsylvania talked about the fiscal cliff and other democrats and republicans will reach a compromise before the deadline and other issues on the agenda. this is 45 minutes. >> thank you. let me introduce the moderator of the program. he is the editorial director of national journal and the atlantic. he oversees the political coverage coming out of our company. he is regularly on cnn and major cable networks. he is the most astute analyst in washington political analyst. we have had changes in the program. jean could not at the last minute make it today. apparently there is a meeting going on right now. maybe it is productive. maybe not. but we do have congresswoman allyson s
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